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Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 66   Replies: 107
posted on Oct 12, 2017 11:03 AM:
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I have seen several examples among the photos shared here. All show fine concepts and great modeling.
Here is a current project I have on the bench. Not many modelers chew into imported brass models to turn them into something else, but it has been done before.

The case here is a 1960's imported brass model by Gem, of an 1880's Illinois Central Forney loco used in Chicago area commuter work until electrification in 1925. It is being transformed into an 1890's era Forney for Staten Island Rapid Transit service, also electrified in 1925.

Here is the subject as received. It wears a thick coat of brass colored paint, had several loose parts and unable to run. The perfect candidate for shop time!






 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 66   Replies: 107
posted on Oct 12, 2017 11:11 AM:
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Here is a photo of the work done so far (I can't seem to add a second photo in the previous message):




 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 66   Replies: 107
posted on Oct 12, 2017 11:22 AM:
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Here is a photo of the prototype I'm modeling, as it looked in 1900. It was built by Baldwin in 1892. Baldwin also built the 1880's Illinois Central Foneys, so they are about the same size.
The replacement stack and domes used in modifying the Gem model are parts for narrow-gauge D&RGW 2-8-0's of the 1890's, also built by Baldwin - a near perfect match!
 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 66   Replies: 107
posted on Oct 27, 2017 06:20 PM:
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Here is the progress of work on the Gem Forney model so far, in its transformation from an 1880's Illinois Central loco to an 1890's engine used on the Staten Island Rapid Transit about when Staten Island became part of City of Greater New York, in the 1898 consolidation of five boroughs.



 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 66   Replies: 107
posted on Oct 31, 2017 11:39 AM:
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Forneys were bi-directional locos having no need to be 'turned' at the end of reach run.
Simply run around the consist and couple up to the other end for the trip back.
For that reason, Forneys usually had a pilot on the back or tender end, like the one up front.
Here is the frame for the tender end pilot, test fitted to the tail beam.
It still has some paint on it, from when the pattern was scratched into it for cutting out that part.
When finished it will look like the pilot in the picture above, including the flag stanchions.


 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 66   Replies: 107
posted on Nov 3, 2017 10:31 AM:
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The rear pilot for the Forney is done. All 15 staves were soldered in place, one at a time. Next the coupler pocket will be removed from the frame and relocated 1/4" farther outward. That way, a Kadee coupler will clear the bottom of the pilot's prow. Pipe detail will be added for the flexible vacuum brake and steam heating lines. For safety reasons, Staten Island passenger cars were steam heated from the locomotive rather than carrying coal burning stoves.



 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 66   Replies: 107
posted on Nov 30, 2017 09:36 AM:
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Here is the re-worked Gem Forney on its 'First Mile' track test, with a new motor on its 28:1 geared drive that will be hidden inside a boiler casing that runs through the cab. At 6.5 volts DC it rolled at about a scale 25-30 MPH. At a full 12 volts, it ran close to a scale 50 MPH. More detail work is yet to be done before it can be painted, striped and lettered.


 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 66   Replies: 107
posted on Dec 4, 2017 11:06 AM:
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The motor, seen it ne above photo, is now covered with a detailed boiler casing.
On the prototype Forney, the boiler/firebox extended through the cab, with the back-head in its end wall.
Here, the casing has been given some details. Most are related to the engineer's side. Since most of the detail will be hidden inside the cab, these will be enough.
From left to right: Tri-cock on the back-head (for determining water level in the boiler), valve and lagged steam pipe for heating the cars. The railroad on Staten Island in the 1800's was very safety minded and did not have stoves in the cars for heat. They also had high level platforms at every station, with access ramps rather than stairs where possible.
Next, steam pressure and vacuum gauges (the Eames vacuum brake was their standard) and top mounted throttle. The vacuum brake stand, reverse lever and piping for the vacuum brake vapor ejector on the cab roof. Other details not likely seen in the enclosed cab were not modeled.




 

   





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