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Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Oct 12, 2017 11:03 AM:
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I have seen several examples among the photos shared here. All show fine concepts and great modeling.
Here is a current project I have on the bench. Not many modelers chew into imported brass models to turn them into something else, but it has been done before.

The case here is a 1960's imported brass model by Gem, of an 1880's Illinois Central Forney loco used in Chicago area commuter work until electrification in 1925. It is being transformed into an 1890's era Forney for Staten Island Rapid Transit service, also electrified in 1925.

Here is the subject as received. It wears a thick coat of brass colored paint, had several loose parts and unable to run. The perfect candidate for shop time!






 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Oct 12, 2017 11:11 AM:
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Here is a photo of the work done so far (I can't seem to add a second photo in the previous message):




 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Oct 12, 2017 11:22 AM:
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Here is a photo of the prototype I'm modeling, as it looked in 1900. It was built by Baldwin in 1892. Baldwin also built the 1880's Illinois Central Foneys, so they are about the same size.
The replacement stack and domes used in modifying the Gem model are parts for narrow-gauge D&RGW 2-8-0's of the 1890's, also built by Baldwin - a near perfect match!
 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Oct 27, 2017 06:20 PM:
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Here is the progress of work on the Gem Forney model so far, in its transformation from an 1880's Illinois Central loco to an 1890's engine used on the Staten Island Rapid Transit about when Staten Island became part of City of Greater New York, in the 1898 consolidation of five boroughs.



 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Oct 31, 2017 11:39 AM:
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Forneys were bi-directional locos having no need to be 'turned' at the end of reach run.
Simply run around the consist and couple up to the other end for the trip back.
For that reason, Forneys usually had a pilot on the back or tender end, like the one up front.
Here is the frame for the tender end pilot, test fitted to the tail beam.
It still has some paint on it, from when the pattern was scratched into it for cutting out that part.
When finished it will look like the pilot in the picture above, including the flag stanchions.


 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Nov 3, 2017 10:31 AM:
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The rear pilot for the Forney is done. All 15 staves were soldered in place, one at a time. Next the coupler pocket will be removed from the frame and relocated 1/4" farther outward. That way, a Kadee coupler will clear the bottom of the pilot's prow. Pipe detail will be added for the flexible vacuum brake and steam heating lines. For safety reasons, Staten Island passenger cars were steam heated from the locomotive rather than carrying coal burning stoves.



 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Nov 30, 2017 09:36 AM:
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Here is the re-worked Gem Forney on its 'First Mile' track test, with a new motor on its 28:1 geared drive that will be hidden inside a boiler casing that runs through the cab. At 6.5 volts DC it rolled at about a scale 25-30 MPH. At a full 12 volts, it ran close to a scale 50 MPH. More detail work is yet to be done before it can be painted, striped and lettered.


 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Dec 4, 2017 11:06 AM:
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The motor, seen it ne above photo, is now covered with a detailed boiler casing.
On the prototype Forney, the boiler/firebox extended through the cab, with the back-head in its end wall.
Here, the casing has been given some details. Most are related to the engineer's side. Since most of the detail will be hidden inside the cab, these will be enough.
From left to right: Tri-cock on the back-head (for determining water level in the boiler), valve and lagged steam pipe for heating the cars. The railroad on Staten Island in the 1800's was very safety minded and did not have stoves in the cars for heat. They also had high level platforms at every station, with access ramps rather than stairs where possible.
Next, steam pressure and vacuum gauges (the Eames vacuum brake was their standard) and top mounted throttle. The vacuum brake stand, reverse lever and piping for the vacuum brake vapor ejector on the cab roof. Other details not likely seen in the enclosed cab were not modeled.




 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Dec 20, 2017 01:45 PM:
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Getting much closer to the finish line on the brass work.
The fire box sides under the cab need to be lengthened.
A back wall for the cab will also be made.
It encloses the cab with a door on each side of the boiler casing and two windows above it.
After completion of the brass work a final track test pulling some cars will be done to check on how it operates.
If all is good, the model will be completely dismantled (again!), with all parts thoroughly cleaned and painted. Some decal striping and lettering will be done before final assembly, to more easily reach confined spaces on the model.



 

   

JuneH
Joined: Dec 29, 2017
Topics: 5   Replies: 30
posted on Jan 3, 2018 10:38 AM:
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Beautiful!
 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Jan 6, 2018 08:55 PM:
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A new back wall for the cab was made to fit around the back head, which is open to the firing deck. Here it's test fitted with the casing for the boiler that fits inside the cab and covers the motor. The wall and casing will be soldered together and made as a removable part. The wall is a snug fit into the cab, set even with the sides. A piece of brass angle soldered to the underside of the roof provides a stop for the top edge of the wall.



 

   

JuneH
Joined: Dec 29, 2017
Topics: 5   Replies: 30
posted on Jan 6, 2018 10:02 PM:
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Wow! Incredible!
 

   

jdcrawler
Joined: Apr 4, 2011
Topics: 45   Replies: 64
posted on Jan 7, 2018 10:07 PM:
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This is fantastic Ed.
I wish I had run across your post on this locomotive before I started on my project, I would have asked you some questions before I got going on it.
After reading your comments of modifying your trailing truck, I think I would have done the same as you on the rear truck and just designate this to run on the larger radius curved track.

 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Jan 8, 2018 12:24 PM:
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Here is how I made the rear truck mounting. As one can see, the wide slot in the truck bolster is what Gem used with a spring loaded king pin. I made the tongue wide for the bolster to have a smooth surface for it to move with the volute spring pressing on it. I made the spring from .030" diameter brass rod in loops which get smaller between its mount on the underside of the floor and the truck bolster. The spring pressure was adjusted by shortening it as well as the degree of separation between coils. here must be enough pressure on the truck to keep it from derailing, should it catch on a track joint or pick at a switch.





Since I run 2 rail analog 12 VDC, it was important that all the insulated left side wheels had electrical contact for the negative side of the circuit. This was done by installing bronze contact wipers with insulated attachments for the left side's front wheel, drivers and rear truck.

This gives the model a full size electrical "foot print" on the track with the + and - sides equal in length. Gem's original arrangement only had the rear tuck insulated from the rest of the body for the negative contact, which was far too short a contact area. That could make operating through switches and over rail crossings problematic, as the wheelbase of the rear truck is rather short.

EdB

 

   

Balto&NY
Joined: Jul 30, 2011
Topics: 72   Replies: 125
posted on Feb 25, 2018 06:45 PM:
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At last the Forney project I have been working on is done. The paint, striping and lettering was finished on Friday, following B&O practice for the 1890's. SIRT was the Staten Island Rapid Transit a B&O New York Terminal subsidiary.

The prototype of this 1892 Baldwin built loco worked until 1906. That is when SIRT converted its steam power to burn anthracite coal with Wootten patent fire boxes, to meet new NY City anti-smoke laws.
The three Baldwin Forneys numbered 16, 17 and 18s were odd locos for SIRT. They were purchased when the PRR controlled the B&O. All other SIRT power was built by Cooke / ALCo at Paterson NJ.

Baldwin Forney 18 was sold in 1906 to the Southern Iron and Equipment Co, which in 1907 resold the loco to a lumber company in Tuscaloosa AL.

EdB
 

   

jdcrawler
Joined: Apr 4, 2011
Topics: 45   Replies: 64
posted on Feb 25, 2018 07:43 PM:
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You did an excellent job on that Ed.
 

   





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